Making superannuation contributions

Superannuation contributions (including personal contributions and employer contributions) are a cash amount, or in some cases an asset, that is contributed to a complying superannuation fund, on behalf of an individual under the age of 75.

Super contributions and earnings on those contributions are the key to accumulating a substantial retirement nest egg. Find out how you can make concessional (before-tax) contributions, non-concessional (after-tax) contributions, receive co-contributions and more.


Listed below are some of our key articles about making super contributions. For more articles on this topic continue scrolling down the page.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Making superannuation contributions.

Q: Where do I go to find a calculator that helps me work out how much co-contribution I will be entitled to, and how much super I need to contribute to get that co-contribution?

Cashing in on the co contribution rules (2014/2015 year)   Super Guide

The federal government is giving away money to anyone who makes a non-concessional (after-tax) contribution to their super fund, and who earns less than $49,488 a year (for the 2014/2015 year). The tax-free giveaway is officially called the co-contribution scheme.

Super concessional contributions: 2014/2015 survival guide   Super Guide

Superannuation contributions can be divided into two types — concessional (before-tax) and non-concessional (after-tax). Each type of super contribution is subject to a contributions cap.

Your 2014/2015 guide to non concessional (after tax) contributions   Super Guide

Non-concessional contributions are more popularly known as after-tax contributions. Such contributions are subject to a contributions cap, which sets a limit on the amount of after-tax contributions that you can make in one year.

Super for beginners, part 2: My first job   Super Guide

Question: I am 16 years of age. I still go to school but I have just started my first part-time job. Do I get any superannuation? And if I do, where does it go?

Superannuation Guarantee: What is the maximum SG employers must pay?   Super Guide

Can you please confirm what the maximum SG contribution is allowed to be for the 2014/2015 year, based on $270,000?

Superannuation Guarantee increases to 9.5% for 2014/2015 year   Super Guide

From 1 July 2014, the Superannuation Guarantee rate increases to 9.5% (from the 9.25% that applies for the 2013/2014 year).

Super for beginners, part 18: My employer hasn’t paid my SG. What can I do?   Super Guide

Q: What steps can I take to ensure my employer contributes all I’m owed to my super fund? I’m a non-resident who has just been refused a visa to stay longer in the country.

Upper limit on SG contributions (for 2014/2015 and previous years)   Super Guide

This article explains the maximum superannuation contribution base for the 2014/2015 year, 2013/2014 year and previous years.

Who can make tax deductible super contributions?   Super Guide

Generally speaking, you can make two types of super contributions: non-concessional (after-tax) contributions and concessional (before-tax) contributions. Concessional contributions can also include tax-deductible super contributions, where an individual claims a deduction.