Making superannuation contributions

Superannuation contributions (including personal contributions and employer contributions) are a cash amount, or in some cases an asset, that is contributed to a complying superannuation fund, on behalf of an individual under the age of 75.

Super contributions and earnings on those contributions are the key to accumulating a substantial retirement nest egg. Find out how you can make concessional (before-tax) contributions, non-concessional (after-tax) contributions, receive co-contributions and more.


Listed below are some of our key articles about making super contributions. For more articles on this topic continue scrolling down the page.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Making superannuation contributions.

Salary sacrificing and super: 10 facts you should know

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Salary sacrificing, by making before-tax super contributions, is a popular strategy for employees on middle-to-high incomes. The deal is that you increase your superannuation balance (and pay 15% contributions tax, and for those earning more than $300,000, 30% tax on super contributions) while … [Read more...]

Financial System Inquiry: Super and retirement summary

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On 7 December 2014, the federal government released the Financial System Inquiry (FSI) Final Report, a 320-page document providing recommendations on five main themes. The FSI committee and secretariat received 6,800 submissions and held hundreds of stakeholder meetings. The FSI crew also met with … [Read more...]

Who can make tax-deductible super contributions?

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Generally speaking, you can make two types of super contributions: non-concessional (after-tax) contributions and concessional (before-tax) contributions. Concessional contributions can also include tax-deductible super contributions, where an individual claims a deduction. For the 2014/2015 … [Read more...]

Cashing in on the co-contribution rules (2014/2015 year)

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Note: The co-contribution rules for the 2014/2015 year (and for the earlier 2013/2014 and 2012/2013 years) are very different from the co-contribution rules applicable for the 2011/2012 year. For your reference and convenience, we have retained the co-contribution rules for these previous years, at … [Read more...]

Concessional contributions: What form do I use to claim a tax deduction?

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Q: I want to make a tax-deductible super contribution to my SMSF. I am trying to find the official form for claiming this type of deduction. Could you lead me to a link where I could find a generic S290-170 notice of intent to deduct? A: You can download the ‘Notice of intent to claim or vary a … [Read more...]

Super concessional contributions: 2014/2015 survival guide

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Superannuation contributions can be divided into two types — concessional (before-tax) and non-concessional (after-tax). Each type of super contribution is subject to a contributions cap. A contributions cap sets a limit on the amount of contributions you can make in any one year. This article … [Read more...]

Contributions caps relate to financial years, not calendar years

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Q: I understand the three-year bring-forward rule that allows you to contribute up to $540,000 in after-tax contributions. My question is: What date does the second three-year period start? For example, if I contributed $540,000 on 28 Dec 2014, does that mean I can contribute another $540,000 after … [Read more...]

Your 2014/2015 guide to non-concessional (after-tax) contributions

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Non-concessional superannuation contributions are more popularly known as after-tax contributions. You may even hear them called ‘undeducted’ contributions. Such super contributions are subject to a contributions cap, which sets a limit on the amount of non-concessional (after-tax) contributions … [Read more...]

Same-sex couples: your super rights explained

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The Australian parliament has decided that it was not the right time to allow same sex couples to marry, and more recently we have elected a Prime Minister who has publicly stated that he feels uncomfortable around homosexuals. We have a new government with a leader who is personally against … [Read more...]

Super for beginners, part 17: Four must-knows about super’s tax rules

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Q: I am trying to understand how my super is taxed and it seems that it is taxed at every turn. Can you please explain when, and how, a super benefit is taxed? A: If it were not for tax, superannuation wouldn’t exist. You would simply invest in your own name. Superannuation is taxed at lower … [Read more...]