Contributions tax

Contributions tax is a tax of 15 per cent on before-tax contributions.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Contributions tax.

Super tax refund for lower-income earners available until 2016/2017 year

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NOTE: The Coalition government has extended the Low Income Super Contribution for another 4 years, as part of a parliamentary deal to secure passage of the repeal of the Mineral Resource Rent Tax. Under the new legislation, the LISC is now payable for the 2012/2013, 2013/2014, 2014/2015, 2015/2016 … [Read more...]

Low-income earners enjoy super tax reprieve for 5 years

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Note: The Coalition government has been forced to extend the Low Income Super Contribution for another 4 years, in addition to the LISC applying for the 2012/2013 year. Due to parliamentary negotiations to secure passage of the repeal of the Mineral Resource Rent Tax, the LISC is now payable for the … [Read more...]

Double contributions tax for high-income earners

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Anyone earning more than $300,000 (including rental property losses and other items) now pays 30% tax on concessional contributions paid into a super fund, doubling the super tax bill for high-income earners. The regular contributions tax is a flat rate of 15%. Concessional contributions include … [Read more...]

Excess contributions: Happy ending to a horror story

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Note: This article contains some good news for those worried about exceeding the contributions caps. The article also includes a summary of the Inspector-General of Taxation’s review into the ATO’s administration of the superannuation excess contributions tax. Any tax regime that can take 93% of … [Read more...]

Super for beginners, part 15: Super tax – as easy as 1-2-3

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Superannuation only exists because of how super savings are taxed. Superannuation savings receive tax incentives to encourage Australians to choose super as a retirement savings option. Even so, superannuation is still taxed (for most Australians) at a lower rate of tax than non-superannuation … [Read more...]

TRIPs: 10 interesting facts about transition-to-retirement pensions

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Note: The general concessional contributions cap is increasing to $30,000 (from $25,000), effective from 1 July 2014. The special $35,000 cap for over-60s will also apply to over-50s from 1 July 2014 (or more specifically, to anyone who is aged 49 years or over on 30 June 2014). An increase in the … [Read more...]

Liberal Party’s superannuation to-do list (updated)

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The Liberal Party and National Party Coalition are now in government and the superannuation agenda has shifted slightly, although the LNP has not yet confirmed all of its pre-election superannuation policies. Outlined below is a quick recap of the LNP’s position on current and proposed … [Read more...]

Superannuation: Hit list for the 2013 Federal Election (September 2013 update)

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UPDATE: The Liberal/National Party coalition won the September 2013 election. For a current list of the government’s current and proposed superannuation policies, see SuperGuide article Liberal Party’s superannuation to-do list (updated). The official election campaign is in full force and we … [Read more...]

Super for beginners, part 17: Four must-knows about super’s tax rules

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Q: I am trying to understand how my super is taxed and it seems that it is taxed at every turn. Can you please explain when, and how, a super benefit is taxed? A: If it were not for tax, superannuation wouldn’t exist. You would simply invest in your own name. Superannuation is taxed at lower … [Read more...]

Non-concessional contributions: Re-contribution strategy still applies

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Q: My wife turns 60 this financial year and it has always been my intention to cash out her portion of our small self-managed super fund (SMSF) and re-contribute it straight back in, so as to ensure that when she and I pass away, our children are not hit by tax. Is that still a valid strategy and if … [Read more...]

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