Super and tax

Find out how your superannuation is taxed including what happens if you retire before the age of 60, the tax-free benefits on or after the age of 60, how the earnings on your super savings are taxed, how your super contributions are taxed, and the tax implications of leaving your super benefits to family or friends when you die.

You can also learn some of the popular tax-effective super strategies, including how the super tax rules affect SMSFs.


Below are some of our key Super and tax articles:

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Super and tax.

Superannuation rates and thresholds for 2014/2015 year   Super Guide

For the 2013/2014 year, the concessional contributions caps for over-60s has jumped to $35,000, while the concessional cap for everyone else remains at $25,000.

Temporary concessional contributions cap expanded to 50 somethings from July 2014   Super Guide

In July 2013, the federal government introduced a temporary concessional contributions cap of $35,000 for over-60s which has been expanded to 50-somethings from July 2014.

Q: Where do I go to find a calculator that helps me work out how much co-contribution I will be entitled to, and how much super I need to contribute to get that co-contribution?

Higher concessional contributions cap applies to over 50s from July 2014   Super Guide

Q: Do you need to be 60 at July 1 or could you turn 60 any time in 2013/2014 to take advantage of the new $35,000 cap?

Cashing in on the co contribution rules (2014/2015 year)   Super Guide

The federal government is giving away money to anyone who makes a non-concessional (after-tax) contribution to their super fund, and who earns less than $49,488 a year (for the 2014/2015 year). The tax-free giveaway is officially called the co-contribution scheme.

Super concessional contributions: 2014/2015 survival guide   Super Guide

Superannuation contributions can be divided into two types — concessional (before-tax) and non-concessional (after-tax). Each type of super contribution is subject to a contributions cap.

Your 2014/2015 guide to non concessional (after tax) contributions   Super Guide

Non-concessional contributions are more popularly known as after-tax contributions. Such contributions are subject to a contributions cap, which sets a limit on the amount of after-tax contributions that you can make in one year.

Australian income tax rates for the 2014/2015 year, (and for 2013/2014 year)   Super Guide

The tax rates applicable for the 2014/2015 year and future years are set out in the tables below. We have also included the tax rates for the 2013/2014, 2012/2013 and 2011/2012 years (including the low-income threshold for the Medicare levy) at the end of the article, for your reference and convenience.

Double contributions tax for high income earners   Super Guide

Anyone earning more than $300,000 (including rental property losses and other items) now pays 30% tax on concessional contributions paid into a super fund, doubling the super tax bill for high-income earners. The regular contributions tax is a flat rate of 15%.

Tax deductible super contributions: Meeting the 10% income test   Super Guide

Q: I work for myself but I also have a part-time job. I have been told that even though I receive SG from my part-time employer, I can also make tax-deductible super contributions. Is that true? And if it is true, how does it work?