Tax-free super

Tax-free means no tax is payable. In terms of superannuation, anyone aged 60 or over can expect tax-free super benefits (unless you’re a public servant). Even when you’re under the age of 60, you may be able to access tax-free benefits.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Tax-free super.

Super for beginners, part 17: Four must-knows about super’s tax rules

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Q: I am trying to understand how my super is taxed and it seems that it is taxed at every turn. Can you please explain when, and how, a super benefit is taxed? A: If it were not for tax, superannuation wouldn’t exist. You would simply invest in your own name. Superannuation is taxed at lower … [Read more...]

Super for beginners, part 8: What happens to my super benefits when I retire?

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Q: I have a superannuation fund accumulating (although I am no longer making super contributions). I am 52 and I intend retiring at age 60. When I do retire can I withdraw the entire super fund as a lump sum and deposit it in to my bank account? What would the tax implications be for taking the … [Read more...]

Turning 60 means tax-free super

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Q: I turned 60 this year and I have been sick since late last year. I can’t get back to work and need to retire. I am wondering if you can tell me what kind of tax I have to pay if I take my super payment. I didn’t tell them I was retired because I kept hoping I’d soon be better. I seem to be … [Read more...]

Tax-free super for over-60s, except for some

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If you withdraw your super benefits after you turn 60 years of age, you can expect to pay NO tax on those super benefits, unless you are a member of certain public sector super funds (see summary table at the end of this article). Due to the large number of emails I receive on this topic, I’ll … [Read more...]

Retiring before the age of 60: the tax deal

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If you retire before the age of 60, your super benefits are likely to be subject to tax — but not always. With the right structure, and usually with expert advice, many Australians retiring early can end up paying no tax. If you’re willing to wait until you turn 60 before you retire, you can … [Read more...]

Cashing in on the co-contribution rules (2015/2016 year)

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Note: This article explains the co-contribution rules for the 2015/2016 year (and later in the article, also for the 2014/2015, 2013/2014, 2012/2013 and 2011/2012 years). The federal government is giving away money to anyone who makes a non-concessional (after-tax) contribution to their super … [Read more...]

TRIPs: 10 interesting facts about transition-to-retirement pensions

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Note: The general concessional contributions cap remains at $30,000 (for the 2015/2016 year, and also applies for the 2014/2015 year). The special $35,000 cap for over-50s continues to apply for the 2015/2016 year (or more specifically, to anyone who is aged 49 years or over on 30 June 2015). If … [Read more...]

Super Guide to the 2015 Tax Discussion Paper

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UPDATE: The government is accepting submissions from the public in response to its 2015 Tax Discussion Paper. The federal government has now extended the submission period until 24 July 2015. I strongly encourage you to make a submission if you want your views heard, and your concerns taken into … [Read more...]

Seniors Health Card (CSHC) changes now law

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The changes to the income test for the Commonwealth Seniors Health Card are now law. In the 2014 Federal Budget, the government announced that the Commonwealth Seniors Health Card (CSHC) income test would be changed so new applicants must include superannuation pension income, from 1 January … [Read more...]

Accessing super early: Terminal illness

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Q: I have a terminal illness. Can I access my super benefits? A: I’m sorry to read about your illness. The superannuation rules do recognise that super benefits can be accessed early under such devastating circumstances. For your information, ‘terminal illness’ for the purposes of accessing … [Read more...]