Super Guide for your 70s and over

When you turn 70, your employer is still required to make compulsory Superannuation Guarantee contributions to your super account, although from the age of 75 you will not be able to make voluntary personal super contributions.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Super Guide for your 70s and over.

THE SOAPBOX: Ban unhedged international shares in default investment options

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Long-term readers of this SuperGuide website may recall my strong support for hedging international investments within default investment options. Alternatively, you can see my position as strong opposition to super funds punting on currency movements when their authority is to invest in … [Read more...]

Super for beginners, part 17: Four must-knows about super’s tax rules

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Q: I am trying to understand how my super is taxed and it seems that it is taxed at every turn. Can you please explain when, and how, a super benefit is taxed? A: If it were not for tax, superannuation wouldn’t exist. You would simply invest in your own name. Superannuation is taxed at lower … [Read more...]

Super for beginners, part 24: Do I have to withdraw my super when I turn 65?

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Q: I retired, sold my large house, downgraded, invested spare money and one month after I invested, I lost $50,000 just like that. I would like to know whether I can keep my super going beyond age 65, maybe to age 67 to help recoup my losses on my outside investment? A: I’m very sorry to read … [Read more...]

What are the super and retirement rules for over-65s?

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Q: My wife (age 63) and myself (age 65) have a small business. I was told by an organisation that at 65 or over I could put money into super, pay 15% tax on the way in and then draw it out when I wished and pay no tax. In fact I have been told to pay myself $30,000 or less and source the rest of my … [Read more...]

Tax-free super for over-60s, except for some

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If you withdraw your super benefits after you turn 60 years of age, you can expect to pay NO tax on those super benefits, unless you are a member of certain public sector super funds (see summary table at the end of this article). Due to the large number of emails I receive on this topic, I’ll … [Read more...]

I’m 67. Can I access my super and continue working?

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Q: I am 67 years-old, and I am still working as a gardener. I would like to continue in employment for as long as possible. I have about $84,000 in super savings. Can I access $80,000 to put on the mortgage of our house and still continue working? Please let me know if this is possible. An … [Read more...]

Super for beginners, Part 9: If I retire and take my super, can I return to work?

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Q: I am 57 years old. Apparently you can get a lump sum of super before 60 if you have permanently retired. Can you still later look for work again? How do you prove you have permanently retired? A: The question that you ask is in the top 10 questions that we receive at SuperGuide. The term … [Read more...]

Age Pension age increasing to 67 years (not 70 years)

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Note: This article explains the current Age Pension age. If you are seeking information on the retirement age for accessing superannuation benefits see SuperGuide article Accessing super: What is my preservation age? Note: If you are seeking information on the changes to the Age Pension asset … [Read more...]

Accessing super: What is my preservation age?

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We receive hundreds of questions each year asking when you can retire under the superannuation rules, and any special conditions you need to meet before you can take your super benefits. The key concept that every Australian needs to be aware of in terms of superannuation, and accessing super … [Read more...]

Accessing super: Preservation age now 56 years (since July 2015)

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Turning 55, retiring and accessing your super is now a retirement planning strategy from the past. Since 1 July 2015, Australians turning 55 will have to wait at least another year before they can access super benefits. Anyone born on or after 1 July 1960 needs to push from their mind that the age … [Read more...]