Salary sacrifice

Salary sacrifice (or salary sacrificing or salary sacrifice arrangement) refers to including before-tax superannuation contributions as part of a salary package, which then reduces a person’s taxable salary and the amount of income tax payable.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Salary sacrifice.

Transition-to-retirement pensions: Will TRIPs stay, or will they go?

On 3 May 2016, in the 2016 Federal Budget, the Coalition (Liberals/NP) government announced that, from 1 July 2017, it intends to remove the tax exemption on pension fund earnings financing a transition-to-retirement pension (TRIP). Subject to legislation, the removal of the tax exemption on fund … [Read more...]

Temporary Budget Repair Levy: More income tax for high-income earners until June 2017

Note: Previously, in rare bipartisanship, the ALP supported the Coalition’s decision to temporarily increase the marginal tax rate by 2 percentage points for those Australians earning more than $180,000. The higher tax rate became law, and applies from 1 July 2014 until 30 June 2017 (3 financial … [Read more...]

Does shift work count for SG entitlements and income protection insurance?

Q: I’m a shift worker and have a question about whether my ‘Super fund salary’ figure which my employer gives to my super fund should include both my base and shift loading salary. At the moment it only includes my base even though my employer does pay super for both my base and shift loading. What … [Read more...]

Salary sacrificing and super: 10 facts you should know

Salary sacrificing superannuation, by making before-tax super contributions, is a popular strategy for employees on middle-to-high incomes. The deal is that you increase your superannuation balance (and pay 15% contributions tax, and for those earning an adjusted taxable income of more than … [Read more...]

Tax-deductible super contributions: Meeting the 10% income test

Q: I work for myself but I also have a part-time job. I have been told that even though I receive SG from my part-time employer, I can also make tax-deductible super contributions. Is that true? And if it is true, how does it work?Individuals who are self-employed, or who are not employed, are … [Read more...]

Superannuation contributions: Wearing two caps for 2016/2017 year

Q: Are the caps relating to ‘concessional’ and ‘non-concessional’ contributions regarded as separate? Put simply, can I contribute $30,000 concessional and $540,000 non-concessional sums (a total contribution of $570,000) to my super fund for the 2016/2017 year?A: The contributions caps are … [Read more...]

Concessional contributions caps: 10 facts you should know

We receive many questions about the concessional contributions caps. Throughout 2016 and into 2017, SuperGuide, as always, will regularly update readers on any proposed changes to the contributions caps (and other super changes), and the implications of such changes on super strategies.The list … [Read more...]

Double contributions tax for more high-income earners

Note: Currently (and until 30 June 2017), anyone earning an ‘income for surcharge purposes’ of more than $300,000 pays an extra 15% tax (total of 30%) on concessional (before-tax) super contributions. super contributions. On 3 May 2016, the Coalition government announced its intention to lower the … [Read more...]

Superannuation Guarantee: Many Aussies miss out on SG increase

Now that we are well into the third financial year of a higher Superannuation Guarantee rate of 9.5%, you can expect some difficult conversations between employers and employees in coming months as some salaried employees discover that the Superannuation Guarantee (SG) increase of 0.25%, which took … [Read more...]

IMPORTANT: SuperGuide does not provide financial advice. SuperGuide does not answer all questions posted in the comments section. SuperGuide may use your question or comment, or use questions from several readers, as the basis for an article topic that we publish on the SuperGuide website. We will not disclose names or personal information in these articles. Comments provided by readers that may include information relating to tax, superannuation or other rules cannot be relied upon as advice. SuperGuide does not verify the information provided within comments from readers. Readers need to seek independent advice about their personal circumstances.