Concessional contributions

Concessional is a term used to describe favourable tax treatment. For example, earnings in superannuation funds receive concessional tax treatment. The term 'concessional contributions' means that such contributions receive special tax treatment.


Concessional contributions are before-tax contributions that can include employer contributions, contributions made under a salary sacrifice arrangement and tax-deductible contributions by an individual.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Concessional contributions.

Temporary concessional contributions cap expanded to 50 somethings from July 2014   Super Guide

In July 2013, the federal government introduced a temporary concessional contributions cap of $35,000 for over-60s which has been expanded to 50-somethings from July 2014.

Higher concessional contributions cap applies to over 50s from July 2014   Super Guide

Q: Do you need to be 60 at July 1 or could you turn 60 any time in 2013/2014 to take advantage of the new $35,000 cap?

Super concessional contributions: 2014/2015 survival guide   Super Guide

Superannuation contributions can be divided into two types — concessional (before-tax) and non-concessional (after-tax). Each type of super contribution is subject to a contributions cap.

Double contributions tax for high income earners   Super Guide

Anyone earning more than $300,000 (including rental property losses and other items) now pays 30% tax on concessional contributions paid into a super fund, doubling the super tax bill for high-income earners. The regular contributions tax is a flat rate of 15%.

Tax deductible super contributions: Meeting the 10% income test   Super Guide

Q: I work for myself but I also have a part-time job. I have been told that even though I receive SG from my part-time employer, I can also make tax-deductible super contributions. Is that true? And if it is true, how does it work?

Superannuation Guarantee: Many Aussies to miss out on SG increase   Super Guide

You can expect some difficult conversations between employers and employees in coming months as some salaried employees discover that the Superannuation Guarantee (SG) increase of 0.25% (taking the SG rate to 9.5%) will not benefit those employees on fixed remuneration packages.

Superannuation Guarantee: 10 facts about your SG entitlements   Super Guide

If you work as an employee, and you satisfy certain minimum requirements, your employer must pay Superannuation Guarantee (SG) contributions on your behalf, to a super fund.

SG now paid for over 70s (since July 2013)   Super Guide

Since 1 July 2013, eligible employees who are 70 years or older have received Superannuation Guarantee (SG) payments from employers. The previous SG rules stopped SG entitlements when an employee turned 70 years of age.

Managing capital gains tax with super contributions   Super Guide

Q: I am about to make a capital gain of about $200,000 on an investment property I have owned for several years. My marginal tax rate is 32.5% and I am an employee, and 43 years old.

Concessional contributions caps: 10 facts you should know   Super Guide

We receive many questions about the concessional contributions caps. Throughout 2014, SuperGuide, as always, will regularly update readers on any proposed changes to the contributions caps (and other super changes), and the implications of such changes on super strategies.