Women and super

Women and superannuation is a special section that includes articles that women may find of special interest, or deal specifically with issues affecting women such as: how much super is enough, how long can you expect to live, divorce, retirement planning in six steps and many more topics.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Women and super.

Salary sacrificing and super: 10 facts you should know

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Salary sacrificing, by making before-tax super contributions, is a popular strategy for employees on middle-to-high incomes. The deal is that you increase your superannuation balance (and pay 15% contributions tax, and for those earning more than $300,000, 30% tax on super contributions) while … [Read more...]

Who can make tax-deductible super contributions?

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Generally speaking, you can make two types of super contributions: non-concessional (after-tax) contributions and concessional (before-tax) contributions. Concessional contributions can also include tax-deductible super contributions, where an individual claims a deduction. For the 2014/2015 … [Read more...]

Cashing in on the co-contribution rules (2014/2015 year)

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Note: The co-contribution rules for the 2014/2015 year (and for the earlier 2013/2014 and 2012/2013 years) are very different from the co-contribution rules applicable for the 2011/2012 year. For your reference and convenience, we have retained the co-contribution rules for these previous years, at … [Read more...]

Super concessional contributions: 2014/2015 survival guide

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Superannuation contributions can be divided into two types — concessional (before-tax) and non-concessional (after-tax). Each type of super contribution is subject to a contributions cap. A contributions cap sets a limit on the amount of contributions you can make in any one year. This article … [Read more...]

Contributions caps relate to financial years, not calendar years

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Q: I understand the three-year bring-forward rule that allows you to contribute up to $540,000 in after-tax contributions. My question is: What date does the second three-year period start? For example, if I contributed $540,000 on 28 Dec 2014, does that mean I can contribute another $540,000 after … [Read more...]

Your 2014/2015 guide to non-concessional (after-tax) contributions

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Non-concessional superannuation contributions are more popularly known as after-tax contributions. You may even hear them called ‘undeducted’ contributions. Such super contributions are subject to a contributions cap, which sets a limit on the amount of non-concessional (after-tax) contributions … [Read more...]

Financial advice: Only 44 independent financial advisers in Australia

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Note: This article is updated regularly when new financial advisers join the independence club (latest update December 2014). A financial adviser does not have to be a member of the IFAAA to join the SuperGuide list, provided they can declare that they satisfy the requirements of being an … [Read more...]

Same-sex couples: your super rights explained

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The Australian parliament has decided that it was not the right time to allow same sex couples to marry, and more recently we have elected a Prime Minister who has publicly stated that he feels uncomfortable around homosexuals. We have a new government with a leader who is personally against … [Read more...]

Why women have to save more super

Women superannuation

When we first launched SuperGuide nearly 6 years ago, I wrote an article explaining why tax-free super in retirement is a non-issue for most women. The reason for making this statement, and which remains valid 6 years later, was that women, on average, have such low super account balances that the … [Read more...]

Super monkeys stop women creating a financially secure retirement

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For so many women, the needs of other people usually come first — children, partner, parents, friends and even workmates. Often, for a woman to think about her own needs, she has to face a health challenge, financial stress or a relationship breakdown. Too dramatic, perhaps? I don’t think so. The … [Read more...]