Super Guide for your 20s 30s and 40s

If you are under the age of 50, you are subject to a lower contributions cap when making concessional (before-tax) contributions. In addition, anyone under the age of 50 cannot access super benefits except in limited special circumstances, such as, suffering severe financial hardship or permanent disability.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Super Guide for your 20s 30s and 40s.

Super alert: Have you counted your super contributions lately?

Note: This article outlines the super contribution rules, and also provides a list of helpful articles that explain how the two types of contributions caps work, and the general contribution rules.You can make two types of super contributions: concessional (before-tax) contributions and … [Read more...]

Excess contributions tax: The most ridiculous super policy ever?

Note: This article outlines the disastrous outcomes that can result when a tax policy is not properly considered, and not properly implemented. The excess contributions rules are now a lot fairer than in the past, and a lot fairer than what is discussed in this article. For the latest excess … [Read more...]

Excess contributions: What happens if I receive an ATO assessment?

The type of assessment and documents that the ATO sends you will depend on whether you exceed your concessional (before-tax) contributions cap, or whether you exceed your non-concessional (after-tax) contributions cap.Continue reading to discover what you can expect after receiving an ATO … [Read more...]

Super concessional contributions: 2015/2016 survival guide

This article explains all of the important rules that apply to concessional (before-tax) super contributions.Superannuation contributions can be divided into two types — concessional (before-tax) and non-concessional (after-tax). Each type of super contribution is subject to a contributions cap. … [Read more...]

Super contributions: How much co-contribution will I get?

Q: Where do I go to find a calculator that helps me work out how much co-contribution I will be entitled to, and how much super I need to contribute to get that co-contribution? I am also looking for something that shows the sliding scale for different income levels and different super … [Read more...]

Cashing in on the co-contribution rules (2015/2016 year)

Note: This article explains the co-contribution rules for the 2015/2016 year (and later in the article, also for the 2014/2015, 2013/2014, 2012/2013 and 2011/2012 years).The federal government is giving away money to anyone who makes a non-concessional (after-tax) contribution to their super … [Read more...]

Super Tip No 1: Treat your super like overtime

If the idea of superannuation doesn’t excite you, yet, imagine, instead of super, that you were being paid overtime for work outside your normal work hours.And if you expected to be accumulating this money every week, you’d be doing some research on how much overtime your company usually paid, … [Read more...]

Your 2015/2016 guide to non-concessional (after-tax) contributions

Non-concessional superannuation contributions are more popularly known as after-tax contributions. You may even hear them called ‘undeducted’ contributions. Such super contributions are subject to a contributions cap, which sets a limit on the amount of non-concessional (after-tax) contributions … [Read more...]

Unrestricted access to super, sometimes

Q: I have been a member of my super fund from about 1993. I see from your 14 legal ways to withdraw your super benefits article, that I may be able to access my restricted benefit. You write: “If you’ve been a member of a super fund since before 1 July 1999, you can cash your ‘restricted … [Read more...]

Superannuation Guarantee rate 9.5% for 2015/2016 year, and for 2016/2017 year

The Superannuation Guarantee rate remained at 9.5% for the 2015/2016 financial year, and again remains at 9.5% for the 2016/2017 financial year. The Superannuation Guarantee rate first increased to 9.5% from 1 July 2014 (the 2014/2015 year).Based on revised laws, the SG rate will remain at 9.5% … [Read more...]