Super Guide for your 60s

If you are under the age of 65, you can make superannuation contributions whether you are working or not. If you're planning to make non-concessional (after-tax) contributions, special rules apply if you are aged 63 or 64.

If you're in your 60s, milestone ages to consider include 60 (tax-free super), and turning 65 (work test for making contributions, unlimited access to super benefits, pension payment factors).

When you turn 65, the rules for accessing super are relaxed. The rules for making super contributions however, become stricter. If you’re 65-plus, you must satisfy a work test if you want to make super contributions.


When you turn 70, your employer no longer has to make Superannuation Guarantee contributions on your behalf (although this rule is set to change from July 2013).

When you turn 75, you can no longer make super contributions. When taking a pension, different pension payment factors apply depending on your age.

Note that the Age Pension age is currently 65 but gradually increasing to age 67.

Set out below are all SuperGuide articles explaining Super Guide for your 60s.

Superannuation rates and thresholds for 2014/2015 year   Super Guide

For the 2013/2014 year, the concessional contributions caps for over-60s has jumped to $35,000, while the concessional cap for everyone else remains at $25,000.

Temporary concessional contributions cap expanded to 50 somethings from July 2014   Super Guide

In July 2013, the federal government introduced a temporary concessional contributions cap of $35,000 for over-60s which has been expanded to 50-somethings from July 2014.

Q: Where do I go to find a calculator that helps me work out how much co-contribution I will be entitled to, and how much super I need to contribute to get that co-contribution?

Higher concessional contributions cap applies to over 50s from July 2014   Super Guide

Q: Do you need to be 60 at July 1 or could you turn 60 any time in 2013/2014 to take advantage of the new $35,000 cap?

Cashing in on the co contribution rules (2014/2015 year)   Super Guide

The federal government is giving away money to anyone who makes a non-concessional (after-tax) contribution to their super fund, and who earns less than $49,488 a year (for the 2014/2015 year). The tax-free giveaway is officially called the co-contribution scheme.

Super concessional contributions: 2014/2015 survival guide   Super Guide

Superannuation contributions can be divided into two types — concessional (before-tax) and non-concessional (after-tax). Each type of super contribution is subject to a contributions cap.

Your 2014/2015 guide to non concessional (after tax) contributions   Super Guide

Non-concessional contributions are more popularly known as after-tax contributions. Such contributions are subject to a contributions cap, which sets a limit on the amount of after-tax contributions that you can make in one year.

Tax deductible super contributions: Meeting the 10% income test   Super Guide

Q: I work for myself but I also have a part-time job. I have been told that even though I receive SG from my part-time employer, I can also make tax-deductible super contributions. Is that true? And if it is true, how does it work?

Superannuation Guarantee: Many Aussies to miss out on SG increase   Super Guide

You can expect some difficult conversations between employers and employees in coming months as some salaried employees discover that the Superannuation Guarantee (SG) increase of 0.25% (taking the SG rate to 9.5%) will not benefit those employees on fixed remuneration packages.

Superannuation Guarantee: 10 facts about your SG entitlements   Super Guide

If you work as an employee, and you satisfy certain minimum requirements, your employer must pay Superannuation Guarantee (SG) contributions on your behalf, to a super fund.